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Editorial

Not sweating the small stuff

Life is simply too fragile to fret over seemingly 'big matters'

New era in relations

FREE TRADE agreements are normally signed between nations not too economically unlike and provide to the signatories mutual advantages as they eliminate tariffs, import quotas and provide preferences on goods and services.

Save the beautiful game

FOOTBALL, or also known as soccer, is the sports with the largest following in the world and it best manifests the phenomenon of globalisation. More than in any other experience, football has shown itself capable of melting national borders down as supporters from all over the world follow specific teams, whether clubs or national. The approaching World Cup competition, to be staged in Brazil some couple of months away, is the best example of how meaningless national borders can become despite the teams themselves representing specific nations. Brazil, arguably the most popular team in the world, is again a hot favourite to take the Cup for the fifth time. The Brazilian footballers, too, can claim to have set the standards of skill in the game to turn it into what it is today. The legendary Pele, who later became a national politician, but with an international following as a footballer, was credited with the banana kick that sent a football on a curved path to bypass a wall of opponents and then to land spectacularly in the net.

Healthcare continuity

Making early symptoms the way forward for inculcating preventive medicine

Asean' s collective power

Enhancing regional dialogue platforms for enhanced security

Reducing road fatalities

A revised syllabus for learner motorists and motorcyclists is set to roll out

Corporate compassion

MISSING Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 is just too high profile to warrant a careless attitude on the part of banks, insurers and employers with any link to its passengers and crew, all vanished as if into thin air. Despite all the noise made of a search area having been identified deep in the southern Indian Ocean, nothing definitive has been found to substantiate the claims of science. However, pretence that nothing is amiss is impossible. Dependents left behind in the lurch through no one's fault must go on. On the one hand, loans, rents, credit cards and other bills left behind have to be paid. On the other, employers are facing a conundrum whether salaries due to those on board who are in employment, all presumed dead, should go on being paid. What if the assumption is false and that science is mistaken?

Eradicating child abuse

The staggering number of victims reaching out for help is shocking

Conservation begins with users

Water rationing is temporary but lessons learnt must be permanent

Improve water management

If water is scarce, then it should cost more to prevent wastage