Malaysia’s Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok described the UK’s supermarket chain Iceland Food and environmental activist Greenpeace’s campaign as an unfair, biased political propaganda that harm farmers’ livelihoods and stakeholders’ earnings in the palm oil industry. NSTP photo by AZHAR RAMLI

PUTRAJAYA: Primary Industries Minister Teresa Kok lauded the UK’s advertising regulator Clearcast's rejection of a supermarket chain’s anti-palm oil Christmas television advertisement.

In a statement today, Kok described supermarket chain Iceland Food and environmental activist Greenpeace’s campaign as an unfair, biased political propaganda.

Iceland Foods owns over 900 stores throughout the UK.

She said Malaysia will not be cowed by Iceland Food’s wrongful video campaign that defames the palm oil industry in developing Asia.

“It smacks of double-standards as well as a blatant attempt to safeguard their homegrown vegetable oil industry at the expense of rival palm oil industry in developing Asia.

“We will not be cowed or stand by idly, when nasty advertisements by Iceland mislead people in markets that are crucial to us. We will fight back with facts from scientifically-researched data,” Kok said.

The minister said Malaysia welcomes the decision by Clearcast to ban the video for Iceland’s Christmas shopping promotion campaign and hopes there will be no reversal of the decision despite pressure from certain quarters.

“Malaysia a responsible member of the international community fulfilling its collective duty in addressing climate change and protecting the world’s biodiversity for the common future of humankind.

“Our efforts to protect our wildlife have also been internationally recognised such as our Sepilok Rehabilitation Centre in Sabah and Semenggoh Wildlife Centre in Sarawak for Orangutans,” she said.

“We welcome Clearcast's decision to prohibit Iceland from using Greenpeace’s rehashed ‘Rang-tan’ video for its Christmas shopping promotion campaign. We support Clearcast to remain steadfast in its decision to uphold the truth, despite wrongful pressure from certain quarters,” Kok said.

Iceland Food's video campaign featured a cartoon orangutan explaining to a girl that its home in the rainforest had been destroyed.

It has since been watched over four million and 15 million times on YouTube and Facebook.

The hashtag #NoPalmOilChristmas is currently trending on Twitter.

A petition for Iceland Foods's campaign that immorally defames the palm oil industry, has now reached more than 944,000 signatures.

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