(File pix) In a media statement sent to the New Straits Times, the national carrier said the network rationalisation exercise which saw a reduction in capacity and suspension of flights to selected destinations, would have an impact on pilot requirements.

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia Airlines (MAS) has denied that its Boeing 777-ER pilots are being forced to leave the national carrier after undertaking a network rationalisation exercise.

While confirming that its rationalisation exercise would have an impact on its pilots, the airline said today they have been offered options, which did not include termination.

In a media statement sent to the New Straits Times, the national carrier said the network rationalisation exercise which saw a reduction in capacity and suspension of flights to selected destinations, would have an impact on pilot requirements.

However, it also said these pilots would have a choice of career options which include voluntary secondment to other airlines in Asia or the Middle East, voluntary no pay long term leave to pursue other careers, or to remain in Malaysia Airlines and await possible long term vacancies in other aircraft types.

MAS added: "The opportunities for secondment to another airline are entirely voluntary for the individual pilot and no 777 pilot has been requested to leave the airline."

This came in light of a report by local Malay daily Kosmo, which said 250 Boeing 777-ER pilots would lose their jobs in the wake of Malaysia Airlines Berhad's decision to stop flying from Kuala Lumpur to Amsterdam, Holland and Paris, France, beginning January 27..

It was also reported some of the affected pilots have been offered voluntary no-pay leave for two years and it said MAS ended the loss-making flights to the two destinations after entering a partnership with Emirates, the world's biggest international carrier on Dec 2 to offer seamless international network to customers.