Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi says Malaysia is open to sharing of information, outside parties must respect the country's legal system which require all evidences be kept for legal proceedings. Pix by HAFIZ SOHAIMI.

BANGI: Any move to share evidence with foreign and international bodies over Kim Jong-nam's murder will only be possible once all investigations and legal processes have been concluded, said Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi today.

He said while Malaysia is open to sharing of information, outside parties must respect the country's legal system which require all evidences be kept for legal proceedings.

"We can share information from our findings in four aspects - DNA, forensics, Chemistry Department (analysis) and evidences through high-definition CCTVs. We can share these with the international intelligence agencies and they can be used by agencies under the United Nations.

"However, it is only after the police have completed their probe and the court has decided on the case.

"The investigation too must be conclusive, which does not only involved the police but also Health Ministry, Chemistry Department, and Department of Civil Aviation, especially the Malaysia Airports Holdings Bhd which owns the CCTVs that recorded the incident.

"While we are open to share our information, they also have to respect our legal system which requires all evidences to be kept until the court decides on the case," he said at the Malaysian Institute of Islamic Training, here.

Zahid was responding to a question on United Kingdom's request for Malaysia to share findings in the case with the UN, so that legal process can be initiated against North Korea which had been alleged of engineering the Feb 13 assassination at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport 2 (klia2).

On UK's request for Malaysia to share information on the VX nerve agent used to kill the estranged half-brother of North Korea's supreme leader Kim Jong-un, Zahid said it can be done through mutual legal assistance with international intelligence agencies.

When asked to whom Malaysia would surrender the deceased's body to, in the event that none of his NOKs come forward, he said the matter will only be decided later, after a conclusive investigation.

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