CCID director Datuk Seri Acryl Sani Abdullah Sani said the strategy of the syndicate was to instil fear in the victim and fooled them into transferring money into the syndicate's account. (NST file pix)

KUALA LUMPUR: Even after repeated warnings and attempts to create awareness on Macau Scam, police have recorded RM21.4 million losses by the victims of these phone scams.

The losses were accounted from 694 cases recorded between January and August this year.

Federal police Commercial Crime Investigation Department (CCID) has received many calls from the public who wanted to verify on dubious calls that they received.

Based on reports, the modus operandi used to scam people revolves on syndicates approaching unsuspecting victims by pretending to be bank officers, court representatives, police officers or debt collectors.

CCID director Datuk Seri Acryl Sani Abdullah Sani said the strategy of the syndicate was to instil fear in the victim and fooled them into transferring money into the syndicate's account.

He said the syndicate would first call the victim and used a technique which made phone number of legitimate authorities appear on the victims’ phones.

The syndicate will then tell the potential victim that the calls were recorded and convinced the victims that they had to pay a certain amount of outstanding payment or debt.

The victim will then be ordered to make payment to clear their names. The syndicate usually gives the victims about 30 minutes to make the payment to an account, usually to an account registered under an individual’s name.

If the victim fails to make the payment, the syndicate will threaten that they risk police arrest or that their bank accounts will be frozen by the authorities.

Acryl today reminded the public to be cautious when receiving such calls.

"Do not trust everything that the caller says and do not give out personal details such as identification card number and bank account details.

"If there is any doubt, end the call immediately and contact the agency to verify the call," he said in a statement.

Acryl also reminded the public that bank officers would never ask for confirmation of bank account number, ask security questions, direct the victim to change pin number or ask them to transfer money via telephone calls.

Government agencies, he said, would not contact the public to ask them to make payments be it tax, summons, service charge or cash transfer to be made to individual accounts.