Banting Hospital became the first public health facility in the country to keep track and the safety of mothers and their new-born’s, through a locally developed safety device. Pix by Intan Nur Elliana Zakaria

KUALA LANGAT: Banting Hospital became the first public health facility in the country to keep track and the safety of mothers and their newborns, through a locally developed safety device.

Called the B-Tag and Track (Safety Device For Mothers and Newborn Babies Delivered in Government Hospitals) it is a pilot project spearheaded and developed by the National Space Agency (Angkasa).

The tags utilising the Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology serves to enhance safety and protect babies from being switched, kidnapped or brought out of the hospital's delivery, post natal or paediatric wards without authorisation.

The B-Tag and Track, comes in a set of three wireless box shaped tag devices measuring less than an inch with replacable hypoallergenic straps, are worn on the mother's hand and her baby's ankle in a pairing system, the third tag meanwhile is attached to the baby's cot.

All devices are monitored through the B-Tag and Track database system stationed at the hospital’s post natal ward where 6 RFID receivers have been installed on the walls alongside 4 door at the entrance and exit doors, mounted with exciters.

When a mother and baby pairing is correct, the tag plays a lullaby and a green LED light flickers, and if there is a mismatch, a warning beep and a red LED light will come on.

The database system's alarms will be raised when it detects any unauthorised exit of babies from the ward, the straps are tampered or becomes loose, the mother and baby tags are untraceable by the RFID receiver within 10 minutes.

The straps will be removed when both mother and their respective infants are discharged.


Wilfred Madius Tangau (3rd left) sharing a light moment with Rosyati Bayet (left) and her baby, who received the B-Tag & Track safety devices at the Banting Hospital today. Also present were Angkasa Director-General Dr Noordin Ahmad (2nd right) and Selangor deputy health director (medical) Dr Murniati Hassan (right). NSTP images by INTAN NUR ELLIANA ZAKARIA

Science, Technology and Innovation minister Datuk Seri Wilfred Madius Tangau who launched the B-Tag and Track system, here, today, handed 21 sets of the devices, including a set for twin babies, to Banting Hospital director Dr Sabrina Che Ab Rahman. It was witnessed by its director-general Dr Noordin Ahmad as well as Selangor state health department deputy director Dr Murniati Hassan.

Wilfred said the pilot project took three months to develop, at a cost of RM200,000 and comes under the ministry's Social Innovation Programme aimed at benefiting the rural folk especially those in the B40 group.

"We hope the B-Tag and Track will further strengthen the safety and security of mothers and their newborn. With these devices, I am sure it will assist in improving the delivery services in hospitals. We hope to expand this to other government hospitals in the future," he said.

The B-Tag and Track, Sabrina said, had been in place since Sept 19 and about 10 mothers and their babies had since utilised the devices.

Meanwhile, Rosyati Baneh who delivered her fourth child at the hospital yesterday, said she felt more secure with the B-Tag and Track.

"I used to be worry about babies being switched when they are placed in the nursery or when I needed to leave my baby to use the bathroom. Now, I am at ease and do not have to worry when I need to move around," said the 24-year-old.

B. Daniyaria, 33, said she was comfortable wearing the tag which is lightweight and it also posed no complications to her newborn son.

"I read the brochures on B-Tag and Track and felt this is a good idea where it removes the worry of mothers. With this, now I don’t have to trouble nurses or other mothers to take care of my baby when I need to use the bathroom," she said.


Banting Hospital became the first public health facility in the country to keep track and the safety of mothers and their new-born’s, through a locally developed safety device. Pix by Intan Nur Elliana Zakaria

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