Britain’s Prince Charles had back-to-back programmes lined up for him today which included interacting with Commonwealth youth leaders and having a closer look at support being rendered to start-up operations. (BERNAMA)

KUALA LUMPUR: Britain’s Prince Charles had back-to-back programmes lined up for him today which included interacting with Commonwealth youth leaders and having a closer look at support being rendered to start-up operations.

He was the guest-of-honour at the Commonwealth Youth Summit that took place at the University of Nottingham Malaysia campus in Semenyih, just outside the Malaysian capital.

Commonwealth Youth Council (CYC) chairman Kishva Ambigapathy said the summit, from today until Sunday, focused on exploring four emerging development issues, namely climate policy and finance; digital economy and entrepreneurship; peace-building and global inequality; and social cohesion.

“Prince Charles heard ideas from young people on the subject matters being discussed,” he said, adding that the Prince of Wales appeared to be amazed with the energy shown by the summit attendees comprising more than 200 youth leaders from over 50 Commonwealth countries.

The youth summit, he said, was a pre-consultation event towards the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) 2018 in the United Kingdom.

Prince Charles was accompanied by Youth and Sports Minister Khairy Jamaluddin and minister-in-attendance Datuk Seri S.K. Devamany, who is Deputy Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department.

Prince Charles and his wife Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, arrived in Malaysia yesterday on an official visit to commemorate the 60th anniversary of bilateral relations between Malaysia and the United Kingdom.

Their Royal Highnesses are scheduled to visit a number of places in Kuala Lumpur, Perak, Sarawak and Penang, as well as participate in various significant events over the span of the visit until Nov 8.

The heir to the British throne also launched the ‘Forgotten Foods Network’ - a global initiative spearheaded by Crops for the Future (CFF) at the CFF headquarters located near the university campus.

CFF chief executive officer Prof Sayed Azam Ali said a balanced diet derived from a diverse range of foods was key to optimal health and nutrition.

He said this was where ‘forgotten foods’ - traditional foods and crops consumed by human ancestors - could play a vital role, especially in light of unpredictable and vulnerable climate conditions of the future.

“The initiative will also raise awareness and scientific research on forgotten foods and crops,” he told reporters after the event here today.

Prince Charles spent about 20 minutes at the CFF laboratories.

Earlier in the day, His Royal Highness visited WORQ, a large-scale co-working space and productivity community in Taman Tun Dr Ismail here.

He had a closer look at how entrepreneurship and the development of start-ups, including in schools, were being stimulated and supported in this country.

WORQ supports early stage start-ups to investment-ready businesses, as well as small and medium enterprises. - Bernama