Some of the 3,500 of megaliths found in Kuala Pilah will soon be relocated to the Pengkalan Kempas History Complex in Port Dickson as part of the state government’s efforts to preserve the ancient structures. (Pix by AMRAN YAHYA)

SEREMBAN: Some of the 3,500 of megaliths found in Kuala Pilah will soon be relocated to the Pengkalan Kempas History Complex in Port Dickson as part of the state government’s efforts to preserve the ancient structures.

Negri Sembilan museum acting director Aziz Mohd Gorip said the megaliths are between 200 to 1,000 years old, which indicates that they are part of an ancient custom in the state.

“The megalith sites identified here have historical value but they are scattered around Kuala Pilah district, especially in Terachi but some of them are located on private land. Because of that, some of the megaliths are not properly maintained and are in a state of decay and despair.

“So, it is crucial to relocate these structures to ensure that they can be well-maintained. The relocation plan is now in the pipeline but it has received the green light from several parties including land owners,” he said after the launch of Megalith Seminar 2017 here today.

Present was state finance officer Datuk Johani Hassan, who represented the State Secretary Datuk Seri Ali Hassan.

There are currently 300 megalith sites in Negri Sembilan and 70 of them are located in Kuala Pilah. Megaliths are popularly known as ‘living stones’ among the locals.

The majority of the sites here are left unattended and this has raised questions as to who is responsible for maintaining the historical sites.

Johani said the seminar called for the establishment of the Megalithic Conservation Center at Pengkalan Kempas History Complex to add more unique and attractive historical attractions to the centre.

“Besides serving as a source of information for the public to know more about megaliths, we believe that it will also help add more tourism products to the centre. We will look through the proposal at the state and federal level through the Department of National Heritage and the Department of Museums,” he said.

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