Dewan Rakyat Speaker Tan Sri Pandikar Amin Mulia (right) says he is ready to debate with Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Abdul Rahman Zohari Abang Openg on their differing views of the Malaysia Agreement 1963 (MA63).

KUALA LUMPUR: Dewan Rakyat Speaker Tan Sri Pandikar Amin Mulia said he is ready to debate with Sarawak Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Abdul Rahman Zohari Abang Openg on their differing views of the Malaysia Agreement 1963 (MA63).

“Oh yes, if he wants to debate with me, he is most welcome," he said.

Pandikar was earlier reported to have said that the emergence of documents in relation to the history of Malaysia's formation, such as the 20-Point Memorandum and the Cobbold Commission Report, led people to believe that some of the demands outlined in MA63 were not met.

Abang Johari yesterday had disagreed with Pandikar's views on MA63, saying that one just cannot describe MA63 as not that important.

In response to that, Pandikar denied saying that MA63 was unimportant.

He said: "If he (Abang Johari) does not agree with me, I also don’t agree with him.”

“If he doesn’t agree with me 10 times, I don’t agree with him 100 times. I’ve read his statement and I did not say that MA63 was not important," Pandikar said.

“If he said that my view is not important, I can also say that his view does not make sense to me.

"I’ve been listening to the views of the Selangor Menteri Besar and the Penang Chief Minister," he said while drawing on Selangor Menteri Besar Datuk Seri Azmin Ali (PKR- Gombak) and Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng (DAP-Bagan).

“I am used to listening to all this (differing views) including the views of the ministers. It doesn't make any difference to me what is the opinion of the chief minister of Sarawak," he added.

Meanwhile, when asked why the Royal Commission of Inquiry report into Bank Negara Malaysia's losses in the 1990s was tabled today on the last day of this year's parliament session, he said the question should not be directed to him.

On why the report was not debated, Pandikar said that every debate needs a motion.

“Every debate will start with a motion. There is no motion from the opposition or the government so how is it going to be debated,” he said while referring to the report.--Reporting by VEENA BABULAL, ARFA YUNUS and FERNANDO FONG

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