Violent online games such as PlayerUnknown’s Battleground (PUBG) should not be blamed for extremist acts, said Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman. (NSTP Archive / Google Image)

PUTRAJAYA: Violent online games such as PlayerUnknown’s Battleground (PUBG) should not be blamed for extremist acts, said Youth and Sports Minister Syed Saddiq Syed Abdul Rahman.

He said extremists would carry out acts of violence with or without exposure to online games.

“Trust me, whether or not there are such online games, people with extremist beliefs will still carry out violent acts,” he added.

He was asked whether the government would ban online games with violent elements such as PUBG following the act of terror at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand last Friday which saw 50 people killed.

Syed Saddiq said online games had nothing to do with the violence that took place in New Zealand.

“This (the incident) is bigger than that. We have to pay our respects to those who have lost their lives but don’t be too quick to blame online games.

“Does it mean that we have to ban all games with shooting elements? I think the shooting in Christchurch is bigger than that.

“Even before PUBG, these kinds of acts happened,” he said when met after the launch of Asia GT Festival at Sepang International Circuit (SIC) earlier today.

Syed Saddiq also said such acts of terror must be condemned by the world.

It has been said that the shooting in Christchurch which was livestreamed by the terrorist resembled the PUBG game.

Several cities in India has moved to ban the game after concerns were raised about its ability to influence people to act violently.

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