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Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran (2nd right) visits the Ipoh Industrial Training Institute (ILP) in Jelapang. Pic by ABDULLAH YUSOF
Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran (2nd right) visits the Ipoh Industrial Training Institute (ILP) in Jelapang. Pic by ABDULLAH YUSOF

IPOH: All skills training institutes currently spread out under various ministries should be streamlined and placed under a single ministry to avoid overlapping functions and waste.

This, said Human Resources Minister M Kulasegaran, can also ensure that allocations are utilised effectively.

He said his ministry will prepare a proposal on the matter which will be discussed at Cabinet level.

“We need to stop overlapping of duties and competition between the ministries involved. We are one family; I will ask the Cabinet for this to be streamlined. We know that wastage occurs (because of the lack of coordination among skills training institutes).

“This is similar to the dissolution of the Land Public Transport Commission (SPAD) by the Cabinet, where all of SPAD’s functions are now placed under the Transport Ministry. We do not want to see any more ministries within ministries,” he said.

Kulasegaran was speaking to reporters after his working visit to the Ipoh Industrial Training Institute (ILP) in Jelapang, on Sunday.

At present, several ministries have their own skills training institutes, among them Majlis Amanah Rakyat (MARA) under the Rural Development Ministry. Other ministries include the Agriculture and Agro-based Industries Ministry, Education Ministry, Human Resources Ministry as well as the Youth and Sports Ministry.

Kulasegaran also suggested that skills training institutes nationwide develop more collaborations with non-Malay industries to diversify such cooperation.

The institutes, he said, also have to find new ways to draw greater participation and maximise the number of participants as the main reason behind its lack of popularity among non-Malays is the language of delivery.

“If we view sectors which are dominated by the Chinese, they place great emphasis on the use of Mandarin and Cantonese. I think we need to have a mindset shift; the language of tomorrow is Mandarin and whether we like it or not, we have to accept this fact.

“As such, collaborations between these institutes and Chinese-owned companies are important so that we can reach the targeted groups and whether we like it or not, the majority of the country’s sectors are controlled by the Chinese so we should work with these companies (to expand the training),” he said.

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