(File pix) The National Union of the Teaching Profession, Parent Action Group for Education and parents recognised the need for sex education in schools. (pix by RAHMAT OTHMAN)

I REFER to “Sex education for children a must” (New Sunday Times, April 16).

In 2009, then culture, youth and sports minister Datuk Ahmad Shabery Cheek held talks with former women, family and community development minister Datuk Seri Shahrizat Abdul Jalil on the need for sex education in primary and secondary schools in a more formal setting.

Six years later, Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Seri Rohani Abdul Karim said sex education for males 16 years and above would be implemented.

The National Union of the Teaching Profession, Parent Action Group for Education and parents recognised the need for sex education in schools.

Apart from improving students’ knowledge on the subject, it could help filter information on the Internet.

Sex education is a pressing issue. Anybody who turns on the television or surfs the Internet agrees that children need to be educated on the subject matter.

But then, not many parents and teachers have the right tool when it comes to disseminating education on reproductive health.

Sex education encompasses several aspects, including physical health (a major consideration when making sexual decisions), mental health (sexual issues that create anxiety and stress) and education (unplanned pregnancy and other health-related issues).

Experts have mentioned the advantages of having sex education in schools, yet some consideration has to be observed.

Those providing information must be trained, qualified and experienced educators, in addition to using approved materials.

AZIZI AHMAD ,

Kuala Lumpur

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