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 (File pix) TraqKid Advisory Board chairman Tan Sri Musa Hassan said the application would help parents locate their children and enable them to get help from the TraqKid call centre and members of the community policing programme in case of emergency. Pix by Asyraf Hamzah
(File pix) TraqKid Advisory Board chairman Tan Sri Musa Hassan said the application would help parents locate their children and enable them to get help from the TraqKid call centre and members of the community policing programme in case of emergency. Pix by Asyraf Hamzah

KUALA LUMPUR: A mobile phone-based child tracking system was introduced yesterday in an effort to assist parents to monitor the whereabouts of their children.

The app, called Traqkid, was developed six months ago by Knightsbridge Resources Sdn Bhd (Knightsbridge Resources) and U Mobile, as part of their community policing programme.

TraqKid Advisory Board chairman Tan Sri Musa Hassan said the application would help parents locate their children and enable them to get help from the TraqKid call centre and members of the community policing programme in case of emergency.

"The TraqKid system uses the U Mobile SIM card, which comes with a location service technology.

"It is very easy to use. There is no need to purchase any other accessory because the SIM-based location technology embedded in the U Mobile SIM card is able to track any GSM device that it is hosted under," he said.

Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Seri Rohani Abdul Karim was present to launch the application yesterday.

Also present were Knightsbridge Resources chairman Kuan Chee Heng and U Mobile Sdn Bhd marketing chief Jasmine Lee.

TraqKid is available now for pre-order. Subscription starts from RM58 per month with U Mobile. Upon registration, there is an upfront fee of RM36 for personal accident insurance.

Meanwhile, Rohani said a total of 723 children were reported missing during the first six months of this year.

She said based on statistics from the police, most of them were teenage girls aged between 13 and 15 years old.

"A total of 345 cases have been resolved.

"(But) This number is increasing and worrying. On average four children are reported to be missing daily." she said.

Meanwhile, Bukit Aman Crime Prevention and Community Safety Department Deputy Director (Strategic Planning), Datuk Fatimah Abd Hamid, said public cooperation is important in helping police locate the missing children.

Translated from Berita Harian

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